Leo and his twin sister Evie were born at 28 weeks gestation. At 4 years old Leo & Evie are dependent on each other and this is completely evident in their personalities, but due to their own specific needs, they do attend different learning settings.

Leo

Leo has been diagnosed with cerebral palsy. Despite this diagnosis Leo has progressed rapidly since being in his foster placement and it is felt by all involved in his care that he will overcome many of the obstacles he will face. His speech is becoming clearer allowing him to express himself and although he can become frustrated about his restricted movement he is now able to self-propel himself via an electronic wheelchair. Leo attends a specialist school and is progressing really well. His current experienced foster carer feels that Leo’s educational needs could be met in a mainstream school in the future. Leo’s teacher describes him as an “enthusiastic and eager child who is determined and confident”. Leo’s foster carer talks about finding caring for Leo so rewarding he is a happy little chatter box with a lovely sunny nature, who is always willing to try new things”.

Leo enjoys the company of others especially adults and older children, he has a great sense of humour and can be very funny! He has a wonderful imagination and loves dressing up and talking on his pretend phone!

Evie

Evie is described by their foster carer as a” lively, bubbly little girl, who finds everything about life so exciting” “A real chatterbox whose enthusiasm for life and new experiences is infectious and a real joy”.

Evie has a wonderful cheeky laugh and smile with the most expressive face so you can tell exactly what she is thinking!

Evie has some minor development delay due to the neglect and lack of opportunities she had with her birth family. However Evie is making excellent progress in all areas of her development since being in her foster placement and attending her local preschool.

Could you be a family for Leo and Evie?

Leo and Evie are described by their foster carers as a ‘joy to care for’; their carers wish for them is that they find their new family soon, as they feel strongly that they deserve to be some ones ‘little prince and princess’.